Opioids and obesity, not ‘despair deaths,’ raising mortality rates for ...

Antropology
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according to new CU Boulder research. The study, published online today in the International Journal of Epidemiology, also found ...

A changing society — 100 is the new 80

Antropology
When it comes to aging successfully and remaining in good health, are centenarians the perfect role models? Or is extreme age inextricably linked with increasing levels of illness? Which diseases most commonly affect people who fail to reach the 100-year mark? Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been studying ...

High-fat ice cream may not necessarily mean tastier ice cream

Medicine
Even though ice cream connoisseurs may insist that ice cream with more fat tastes better, a team of Penn State food scientists found that people generally cannot tell the difference between fat levels in ice creams. In a series of taste tests, participants were unable to distinguish a 2 percent ...

Working at ‘breastaurants’ damaging to women’s mental health

Antropology
 Women who work in restaurants that require their bodies to be on display through revealing uniforms may experience higher levels of anxiety and disordered eating, according to a new University of Tennessee, Knoxville, study. The study also found that female servers in these types of restaurants — dubbed “breastaurants” because ...

The last survivors on Earth

EcologyMore Science
The world’s most indestructible species, the tardigrade, an eight-legged micro-animal, also known as the water bear, will survive until the Sun dies, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. The new study published in Scientific Reports, has shown that the tiny creatures, will survive the risk of extinction from all ...

Diet rich in tomatoes cuts skin cancer in half in ...

Medicine
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Daily tomato consumption appeared to cut the development of skin cancer tumors by half in a mouse study at The Ohio State University. The new study of how nutritional interventions can alter the risk for skin cancers appeared online in the journal Scientific Reports. It found that ...

Cannibalism: A new way to stop the spread of disease

More Science
Cannibalism may be just what the doctor ordered, according to a new study that will be published in American Naturalist led by former LSU postdoctoral researcher and current University of California, San Diego, or UCSD, postdoctoral researcher Benjamin Van Allen, along with other individuals in Bret Elderd lab’s at LSU ...

Why strength depends on more than muscle

More Science
A recent study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has given new meaning to the concept of brain power by suggesting that physical strength might stem as much from exercising the nervous system as the muscles it controls. Over the past few years, researchers have found evidence that lifting more repetitions ...
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  • Paying people to save trees could also save money July 24, 2017
    Paying people to conserve trees may be a cost-effective way to curb deforestation and reduce carbon emissions and should be a key component of fighting climate change, a new study suggests. The study sought to evaluate how effective “Payments for Ecosystems” (PES) is at reducing deforestation. PES is a program in which people receive financial […]
  • How much plastic have humans made? July 22, 2017
    Humans have created more than 8 billion metric tons of plastic since the large-scale production of synthetic materials began in the early 1950s, a new study suggests. The study provides the first global analysis of the production, use, and fate of all plastics ever made, including synthetic fibers. “We cannot continue with business as usual unless […]