Working at ‘breastaurants’ damaging to women’s mental health

Antropology
 Women who work in restaurants that require their bodies to be on display through revealing uniforms may experience higher levels of anxiety and disordered eating, according to a new University of Tennessee, Knoxville, study. The study also found that female servers in these types of restaurants — dubbed “breastaurants” because ...

The last survivors on Earth

EcologyMore Science
The world’s most indestructible species, the tardigrade, an eight-legged micro-animal, also known as the water bear, will survive until the Sun dies, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. The new study published in Scientific Reports, has shown that the tiny creatures, will survive the risk of extinction from all ...

Diet rich in tomatoes cuts skin cancer in half in ...

Medicine
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Daily tomato consumption appeared to cut the development of skin cancer tumors by half in a mouse study at The Ohio State University. The new study of how nutritional interventions can alter the risk for skin cancers appeared online in the journal Scientific Reports. It found that ...

Cannibalism: A new way to stop the spread of disease

More Science
Cannibalism may be just what the doctor ordered, according to a new study that will be published in American Naturalist led by former LSU postdoctoral researcher and current University of California, San Diego, or UCSD, postdoctoral researcher Benjamin Van Allen, along with other individuals in Bret Elderd lab’s at LSU ...

Why strength depends on more than muscle

More Science
A recent study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has given new meaning to the concept of brain power by suggesting that physical strength might stem as much from exercising the nervous system as the muscles it controls. Over the past few years, researchers have found evidence that lifting more repetitions ...

First battery-free cellphone makes calls by harvesting ambient power

Engineering
University of Washington researchers have invented a cellphone that requires no batteries — a major leap forward in moving beyond chargers, cords and dying phones. Instead, the phone harvests the few microwatts of power it requires from either ambient radio signals or light. The team also made Skype calls using ...

Strange silk: Why rappelling spiders don’t spin out of control

More Science
WASHINGTON, D.C., July 7, 2017 — The last time you watched a spider drop from the ceiling on a line of silk, it likely descended gracefully on its dragline instead of spiraling uncontrollably, because spider silk has an unusual ability to resist twisting forces. In a new paper appearing this ...

Litter bugs may protect chocolate supply

More Science
Those who crave brownies or hot cocoa may be happy to hear that heroes too small to be seen may help to protect the world’s chocolate supply. Scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama found that exposing baby cacao plants to microbes from healthy adult cacao plants ...
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  • How much plastic have humans made? July 22, 2017
    Humans have created more than 8 billion metric tons of plastic since the large-scale production of synthetic materials began in the early 1950s, a new study suggests. The study provides the first global analysis of the production, use, and fate of all plastics ever made, including synthetic fibers. “We cannot continue with business as usual unless […]
  • Aging oilfields pollute more and produce less July 21, 2017
    As the world’s largest oilfields age, the power required to keep them operating can rise dramatically even as the amount of petroleum they produce drops, a new study suggests. Failing to take the changing energy requirements of oilfields into account can cause oilfield managers or policymakers to underestimate the true climate impacts, the study’s authors […]