Why are genetically identical individuals different? Ask your mum!

More Science
  Does the age of a mother influence the traits and characteristics of her progeny, and how? A team of scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona have addressed these questions by studying tiny, genetically identical C. elegans worms. Their results have been published ...

The Caribbean is stressed out

Ecology
  Forty percent of the world’s 2.5 billion people live in coastal cities and towns. A team including Smithsonian marine biologists just released 25 years of data about the health of Caribbean coasts from the Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity Program (CARICOMP). The study provides new insights into ...

Can e-cigarettes help smokers quit?

Medicine
As e-cigarettes become more popular, fewer people are taking up smoking traditional cigarettes. But can e-cigarettes, an electronic nicotine delivery system, help people quit smoking altogether? That was the focus of a recent study led by a Hollings Cancer Center researcher. The study found that smokers who ...

UGR researchers put a geophysical database of Antarctica at the ...

Geology
An international group of scientists, led by Professor of Earth Physics Jesús M. Ibáñez Godoy from the University of Granada (UGR), has made available to the whole scientific community, through a public, free access database, the results of a geophysical research they carried out on Deception Island, ...

Befriending oneself has benefits, but backup plan recommended

Biology
PULLMAN, Wash.- As weird animals go, the mangrove killifish is in a class of its own. It flourishes in both freshwater and water with twice as much salt as the ocean. It can live up to two months on land, breathing through its skin, before returning to ...

Alaskan microgrids offer energy resilience and independence

Engineering
  The electrical grid in the contiguous United States is a behemoth of interconnected systems. If one section fails or is sabotaged, millions of citizens could be without power. Remote villages in Alaska provide an example of how safeguards could build resilience into a larger electrical grid. ...

First evidence for Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain discovered

Archaeology
The first evidence for Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain has been discovered by archaeologists from the University of Leicester. The findings will be explored as part of the BBC Four’s Digging For Britain on Wednesday 29 November. Based on new evidence, the team suggests that the first ...

Artificially lit surfaces on Earth increase more than 2% per ...

Astronomy
Concerns about light pollution arose in the astronomical field as a consequence of its adverse effects on astronomical observations, but in the last decade there has been a proliferation of studies connecting the excess of nocturnal lighting to health hazards and damage to ecosystems which, compounded with ...
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  • The Milky Way ate 11 other galaxies January 17, 2018
    Astronomers have discovered 11 new stellar streams—remnants of smaller galaxies torn apart and devoured by our Milky Way. The finding is among the highlights of the first three years of survey data from the Dark Energy Survey—research on about 400 million astronomical objects, including distant galaxies as well as stars in our own galaxy. The […]
  • Massive database lists one-third of the world’s plants January 9, 2018
    Researchers have created the first complete list of all known vascular plant species in the Americas. The searchable database contains nearly 125,000 species representing one-third of all known vascular plants worldwide. Vascular plants are land plants with specialized internal-transport and vertical-support tissues. The vast majority of plant species on Earth are vascular plants, including trees, […]