A light in the dark: NASA sounding rocket probes the ...

Astronomy
Though stars and galaxies fill our night sky, most of the matter in the universe resides in the dark voids in between. Spread out over unfathomable distances, this cold, diffuse gas between galaxies — called the intergalactic medium, or IGM for short — hardly emits any light, ...

World’s first super-microsurgery operation with ‘robot hands’

Engineering
MAASTRICHT, Oct. 2, 2017 – Plastic surgeons at Maastricht University Medical Center have used a robotic device to surgically treat lymphedema in a patient. This is the world’s first super-microsurgical intervention with ‘robot hands’. The surgeons used the robotic device to suture vessels of 0.3 to 0.8 ...

CARMENES instrument demonstrates its ability to find Earth-like planets

Astronomy
CARMENES instrument, developed by a consortium of eleven German and Spanish institutions and coordinated by the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia (IAA-CSIC), with the participation of the Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC-CSIC) and the Center for Astrobiology (CAB, CSIC-INTA) was designed to search for terrestrial planets ...

Milky Way’s ‘most-mysterious star’ continues to confound

More Science
Pasadena, CA — In 2015, a star called KIC 8462852 caused quite a stir in and beyond the astronomy community due to a series of rapid, unexplained dimming events seen while it was being monitored by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope. And the star has continued to foil ...

To kickstart creativity, offer money, not plaudits, study finds

Antropology
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — How should employers reward creative types for turning in fresh, inventive work: with a plaque or a party recognizing their achievement, or with cold, hard cash? According to new research co-written by a University of Illinois expert in product development and marketing, it’s all ...

Feeling sated can become a cue to eat more

Medicine
When hunger pangs strike, we usually interpret them as a cue to reach for a snack; when we start to feel full, we take it as a sign that we should stop eating. But new research shows that these associations can be learned the other way around, ...

Elderly who have trouble identifying odors face risk of dementia

Medicine
A long-term study of nearly 3,000 adults, aged 57 to 85, found that those who could not identify at least four out of five common odors were more than twice as likely as those with a normal sense of smell to develop dementia within five years. Although ...

Meet the hominin species that gave us genital herpes

Paleontolgy
Two herpes simplex viruses infect primates from unknown evolutionary depths. In modern humans these viruses manifest as cold sores (HSV1) and genital herpes (HSV2). Unlike HSV1, however, the earliest proto-humans did not take HSV2 with them when our ancient lineage split from chimpanzee precursors around 7 million ...
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  • Algorithms can’t replace these jobs of the future November 3, 2017
    Computers have quickly moved from providing pure processing power to learning and adapting without programming, creating widespread unease that the rise of the machines will leave many jobless. In 2013, Oxford University research suggested that within the next 10-20 years some 47 percent of US jobs will be at risk of replacement by computers and […]
  • Corals eat plastic for the taste, not by accident November 1, 2017
    Corals eat plastic because they are drawn to its taste, new research indicates. Scientists have long known that marine animals mistakenly eat plastic debris because the tiny bits of floating plastic might look like prey, but the new study of plastic ingestion by corals suggests there may be an additional reason for the potentially harmful […]